Friday, March 11, 2011

The Declassified Adoptee: You Know, I Think I Was "Angrier" Before

The Declassified Adoptee: You Know, I Think I Was "Angrier" Before

Out of the fog! True! This is a fantastic blog! Please read it. I mention coming out of my fog in the memoir...

4 comments:

  1. Amanda! I have tried twice to post a comment on your blog and was not able to. You write beautifully!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Amanda! I have tried twice to post a comment on your blog and was not able to. You write beautifully!

    ReplyDelete

Please: Share your reaction, your thoughts, and your opinions. Be passionate, be unapologetic. Offensive remarks will not be published. We are getting more and more spam. Comments will be monitored.

Obama Unveils Plan To Help Young American Indians

Obama Unveils Plan To Help Young American Indians
click photo to read

Truth

Three Books on Lost Birds

ICWA headlines

ICWA headlines
click to read

Good Words

Mila @yoonsblur: What can non-adopted people do to help adoptees feel respected in our spaces? Remember that they are guests. Remember that they are visitors. Remember that they will NEVER know what it's like to live an adopted life. Remember that they are visiting our home, our land, our territory. And hence, they need to act and behave accordingly. I like to use the analogy of a heart transplant patient. A heart transplant patient is the only one who knows what it is like to undergo transplantation. They are the only ones who know how it feels to be a transplant patient. The doctors, nurses, family members, etc. do not know what it is like to live life as a transplant patient and none of them would insist that they know what it feels like. They can help take care of the patient, they may even have valuable knowledge that may be applicable, but they still have no clue what it's like to live life as a transplant patient. Even the doctors and nurses can only help if they listen to the patient. Assumptions are dangerous and could even lead to death. Hence, knowledge is never equivalent to experience. A White person who has a Ph.D in African American studies will never know what it's like to live life as an African American. That Ph.D does not make the White person an "expert" on being African American. Similarly, unless you are an adoptee--no matter how many books you've read, no matter how many adopted children you've raised--you will NEVER know what it's like to be an adoptee. So, respect that. Sit down. Listen. Acknowledge. Validate. Do not presume. Do not dismiss. Do not negate. Do not pit adoptees against each other by saying, "Well, I know this one adoptee who..." Turn your mouth off and your ears on. That's what non-adopted folks can do if they truly want to understand and respect adoptees in our spaces.
Lost Daughters Blog LINK

Search Safely

StartPage