How to Use this Blog

Howdy! We've amassed tons of information and important history on this blog since 2010. If you have a keyword, use the search box below. Also check out the reference section above. If you have a question or need help searching, use the contact form at the bottom of the blog.

ALSO, if you buy any of the books at the links provided, the editor will earn a small amount of money or commission. (we thank you) (that is our disclaimer statement)

This is a blog. It is not a peer-reviewed journal, not a sponsored publication... The ideas, news and thoughts posted are sourced… or written by the editor or contributors.

FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/AmericanIndianAdoptees

2017: 3/4 million Visitors/Readers! This blog was ranked #49 in top 100 blogs about adoption. Let's make it #1...

Search This Blog

Standing Rock

Monday, November 26, 2012

The Real Criminals: Adoption Mafia #NAAM

The Indian Child Welfare Act at 30 is available on Amazon.com

By Trace A. DeMeyer
We must understand history to see where we've been and where we are today to face the future.
The effects on STOLEN GENERATIONS are still being felt in 2012. In Indian Country, Native adoptees are still called Lost Birds or Split Feathers or Lost Ones. Many adult adoptees are still lost to their families and tribal nations. A lost child will remain lost with sealed adoption records. Today's legislators and lawmakers obviously do not know or recognize the crimes committed against Indian people that still affect us.

As I discussed in my books, many children were stolen, literally abducted. This was legal since it was done with the government's approval, programs and funding. Those social workers who drove to reservations and snatched children were never charged with kidnapping. Some siblings were taken but then split up in foster care and later adoptions. How did this serve the children? It didn't.

Some Native mothers were pressured in hospitals to give up their newborn babies to social workers (some were nurses and nuns) trained in mental humiliation. These heartless individuals were not criminally prosecuted for coercion or harassment of these mothers. We could ask why these Indian mothers were not offered financial assistance instead to keep and raise their own child. The adoption agencies (run by states and various religions) and social workers were paid to place untold numbers of Indian Children and made their careers and money doing it. They were not there to help Indian mothers; they were there to get the baby. This is how pure greed took over their adoption practices. Social workers worked like Mafia to get what they needed. Long lists of people wanted to adopt and the Adoption Mafia had to fill their orders with new babies, no matter what.

Great crimes against Indian people, first taking land then children, went on for centuries and tribes were losing. After years of trying to stop it, finally in 1976, Indian leaders went to Congress and told them what was happening to their children which lead to the passage of the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978. There was never prosecution of the real criminals. No one will deny that some Indian reservations are places of great poverty, a condition they didn't create but one they were forced to adapt to and survive. Even today it's a struggle but Indian people have retained some of their ceremonies, languages and cultures on these reservations and they want future generations to retain this. They want their children to live their culture.

Finally, I ask those people who adopted us, did you have any idea what was happening to Indian people and their children? Did you know about the wholesale removals of Indian Children now described accurately as cultural genocide? Did you even inquire as to why this baby or child was given up? Did you investigate or ask to meet with our parents? What did the adoption industry or social workers say to you about this? Were you complicit and aware of the adoption industry's Indian Adoption projects and programs?

These are real crimes and atrocities against Indian People yet no one involved has been charged or put in prison?
When details of the Indian Adoption Projects were sealed and files were closed after adoptions, a child would not have his/her name or tribal identity anymore, with their birth certificate altered and falsified. Tribal membership might exist for some adoptees on paper but with secrecy and sealed files, the adult adoptee would never know or be able to find out. It appears that was the plan. Until adoption records are opened and Native adoptees know their family name and tribe, a crime is still being committed. When adoptees do return to their tribes, some find rejection. Why? Adoption changed us. We do not know our language or know our history or culture because adoption erased it. That is not an adoptees fault yet no one is ever charged with the crime of forced assimilation via closed adoption?

Today there are non-Indians lobbying to end the Indian Child Welfare Act. This group of non-Indians feels they will be better parents to Indian children. They want no restrictions in order to adopt Indian children. Their attempt to change federal law must not happen. Indians must stand together to prevent this group from the only law that protects children from the Adoption Mafia.
(I will be on Jay Winter Night Wolf's Radio Program on Nov. 30, at 7 pm (Eastern Time). Listen in at http://www.wpfwfm.org)    

Note: I will be taking a break from blogging. If you'd like to write a post, please email me: tracedemeyer@yahoo.com

1 comment:

  1. I just found out through my newly-found father that we are part Comanche through his mother, my grandmother. If that is the case, I want my ICWA rights! Oh ya, that's right, I was born in 1969 before ICWA was enacted.

    ReplyDelete

Please: Share your reaction, your thoughts, and your opinions. Be passionate, be unapologetic. Offensive remarks will not be published. We are getting more and more spam. Comments will be monitored.

Every. Day.

Every. Day.
adoptees take back adoption narrative and reject propaganda

To Veronica Brown

Veronica, we adult adoptees are thinking of you today and every day. We will be here when you need us. Your journey in the adopted life has begun, nothing can revoke that now, the damage cannot be undone. Be courageous, you have what no adoptee before you has had; a strong group of adult adoptees who know your story, who are behind you and will always be so.

Three Years already

Join!

National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network (NISCWN)

Membership Application Form

The Network is open to all Indigenous and Foster Care Survivors any time.

The procedure is simple: Just fill out the form HERE.

Source Link: NICWSN Membership

Customer Review

Thought-provoking and moving 11 October 2012
Two Worlds - Lost children of the Indian Adoption Projects

If you thought that ethnic cleansing was something for the history books, think again. This work tells the stories of Native American Indian adoptees "The Lost Birds" who continue to suffer the effects of successive US and Canadian government policies on adoption; policies that were in force as recently as the 1970's. Many of the contributors still bear the scars of their separation from their ancestral roots. What becomes apparent to the reader is the reality of a racial memory that lives in the DNA of adoptees and calls to them from the past.
The editors have let the contributors tell their own stories of their childhood and search for their blood relatives, allowing the reader to gain a true impression of their personalities. What becomes apparent is that nothing is straightforward; re-assimilation brings its own cultural and emotional problems. Not all of the stories are harrowing or sad; there are a number of heart-warming successes, and not all placements amongst white families had negative consequences. But with whom should the ultimate decision of adoption reside? Government authorities or the Indian people themselves? Read Two Worlds and decide for yourself.

Read this SERIES

Read this SERIES
click image

ADOPTION TRUTH

As the single largest unregulated industry in the United States, adoption is viewed as a benevolent action that results in the formation of “forever families.”
The truth is that it is a very lucrative business with a known sales pitch. With profits last estimated at over $1.44 billion dollars a year, mothers who consider adoption for their babies need to be very aware that all of this promotion clouds the facts and only though independent research can they get an accurate account of what life might be like for both them and their child after signing the adoption paperwork.

Our Fault? (no)

Leland at Goldwater Protest

#defendicwa

A photo posted by defendicwa (@defendicwa) on