How to Use this Blog

Howdy! We've amassed tons of information and important history on this blog since 2010. If you have a keyword, use the search box below. Also check out the reference section above. If you have a question or need help searching, use the contact form at the bottom of the blog.

ALSO, if you buy any of the books at the links provided, the editor will earn a small amount of money or commission. (we thank you) (that is our disclaimer statement)

This is a blog. It is not a peer-reviewed journal, not a sponsored publication... The ideas, news and thoughts posted are sourced… or written by the editor or contributors.

2017: 3/4 million Visitors/Readers! This blog was ranked #49 in top 100 blogs about adoption. Let's make it #1...

Search This Blog

Lost Children Book Series

Accept nothing less

Thursday, December 6, 2012

Father is ready to turn page on Utah adoption horror story

  • (Courtesy photo)  
Leah Frei, now 21 months, has lived with her adoptive parents since birth. Her biological father, who calls her Teleah, is waging a legal battle to get her back.  (Courtesy photo)  
Leah Frei, now 21 months old, has lived with her adoptive parents since birth. Her biological father, who calls her Teleah, is waging a legal battle to get her back. (Courtesy photo)  
Leah Frei, now 21 months old, has lived with her adoptive parents since birth. Her biological father, who calls her Teleah, is waging a legal battle to get her back. (Courtesy photo)  
Leah Frei, now 21 months old, has lived with her adoptive parents since birth. Her biological father, who calls her Teleah, is waging a legal battle to get her back. (Courtesy photo)  
Terry Achane with his daughter, whom he named Teleah. “There are precious moments I can’t get back.” (Courtesy photo)  
Staff Sgt. Terry Achane, right, at Fort Jackson in South Carolina, with Pfc.. James Wilson.

  • (Courtesy photo)  
Terry Achane, of South Carolina, with his daughter, whom he named Teleah, after a court hearing in Utah. The child, now 21 months, was placed for adoption at birth without his knowledge or consent. (Courtesy photo)  
Terry Achane, of South Carolina, with his daughter, whom he named Teleah, after a court hearing in Utah. The child, now 21 months, was placed for adoption at birth without his knowledge or consent. Courtesy
Terry Achane, of South Carolina, with his daughter, whom he named Teleah, after a court hearing in Utah. The child, now 21 months, was placed for adoption at birth without his knowledge or consent. Courtesy
Terry Achane, who joined the U.S. Army after high school, is now a staff sergeant at Fort Jackson in South Carolina. Achane is fighting to get back his daugher, who was placed for adoption in Utah by his then-wife without his knowledge or consent.
  • I could on for an hour about this but I won't. Fathers have rights and this time, a father got his daughter back after adoption. Hooray! Trace


  • Utah courts » Judge orders adoptive parents to return child to father, who is ready for new life with daughter.

    A 4th District Court judge says he is "astonished and deeply troubled" by a Utah adoption agency’s deliberate move to circumvent the rights of a married man whose daughter was adopted at birth without his knowledge.
    The Provo judge, while noting the birth mother had deceived her husband, the adoption agency and the prospective parents, has given the adoptive couple 60 days to give the child back.

    A married father’s rights
    While unmarried biological fathers must act to preserve their parental rights and have a limited time to do so, married fathers are presumed to have a constitutional, fundamental liberty interest in their children.
    A married father “has the exact same parental rights as the mother from the get-go,” said Salt Lake attorney Scott Wiser, who with his father represents Terry Achane. “It is the same reason why any other married parent would not have to worry about filing a paternity petition or jumping through a series of legal hoops to get their kids back if a third-party like a neighbor or day-care provider decided not to return their kids.”
    Unless his parental rights have been terminated for cause, the father’s consent to an adoption is required.
    In his ruling in the Achane case, 4th District Judge Darold McDade called the situation painful and heartbreaking while noting previous Utah Supreme Court rulings that found that prospective adoptive parents are “legal strangers” who have no rights other than to temporarily care for the child until custody can be returned to a natural parent and that any bonding that may have occurred while they had custody is “legally irrelevant.”
     
    In a 48-page ruling, Judge Darold McDade said the Adoption Center of Choice’s policy of refusing to disclose any information to Terry Achane once he learned what had happened to his baby is "utterly indefensible."

    Salt Lake City attorneys Mark and Scott Wiser, the father/son team that represented Achane, used even stronger language for what occurred.

    "This is a case of human trafficking," said Mark Wiser. "Children are being bought and sold. It is one thing what [adoption agencies] have been doing with unmarried biological fathers. It is in a new area when they are trying to take a child away from a married father who wants to have his child."

    Jared and Kristi Frei, the adoptive parents, declined to comment, as did Kasey Wright, their former attorney, and Larry Jenkins, newly hired to represent the couple. James Webb, executive director of the Adoption Center of Choice, based in American Fork, did not return a call from The Salt Lake Tribune. The Tribune attempted to reach Tira Bland, the birth mother who is now divorced from Achane, but was unsuccessful.

    On a blog about the case, where the Freis have raised more than $20,000 to help with legal bills, they vow to appeal McDade’s decision, describing the arrival of Achane’s daughter in their lives "a righteous desire blessed to fruition by God."

    "We have not lost our conviction that we are in the right!!!!!!" Kristi Frei wrote after McDade’s Nov. 20 ruling dismissed their adoption petition. "We have only ever wanted to do right by Leah, and have always felt we have been acting in her best interest to keep her with our family and raise her as our own. Our hearts have demanded it — there has never been any question to us that she is OURS!!!"

    Achane, 31, still finds the position he is in hard to believe and just wants the baby girl he has met just twice and calls Teleah, the name he picked out before her birth, back.

    "I am not a very religious person," he said in an interview Friday, "but ‘Thou shalt not steal.’ If they prolong it, that is more time away from my daughter. There are precious moments I can’t get back. ... It has been a year and a half now. There is no court order saying they have the right to my child. I just won the case. I want to get my daughter and raise my daughter."

    Texas marriage •
    Achane and Bland, both then residents of Texas, married in February 2009 and learned around late June 2010 that Bland was expecting their first child. Achane, who is in the U.S. Army, accompanied his wife to prenatal visits and was there when an ultrasound revealed they were having a girl. They shared a joint bank account and Achane carried Bland and her daughter from a previous relationship on his military health insurance, which he also expected would cover the new baby.

    No comments:

    Post a Comment

    Please: Share your reaction, your thoughts, and your opinions. Be passionate, be unapologetic. Offensive remarks will not be published. We are getting more and more spam. Comments will be monitored.

    Across North America

    Every. Day.

    Every. Day.
    adoptees take back adoption narrative and reject propaganda

    To Veronica Brown

    Veronica, we adult adoptees are thinking of you today and every day. We will be here when you need us. Your journey in the adopted life has begun, nothing can revoke that now, the damage cannot be undone. Be courageous, you have what no adoptee before you has had; a strong group of adult adoptees who know your story, who are behind you and will always be so.

    Join!

    National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network (NISCWN)

    Membership Application Form

    The Network is open to all Indigenous and Foster Care Survivors any time.

    The procedure is simple: Just fill out the form HERE.

    Source Link: NICWSN Membership

    Read this SERIES

    Read this SERIES
    click image

    ADOPTION TRUTH

    As the single largest unregulated industry in the United States, adoption is viewed as a benevolent action that results in the formation of “forever families.”
    The truth is that it is a very lucrative business with a known sales pitch. With profits last estimated at over $1.44 billion dollars a year, mothers who consider adoption for their babies need to be very aware that all of this promotion clouds the facts and only though independent research can they get an accurate account of what life might be like for both them and their child after signing the adoption paperwork.

    Our Fault? (no)

    Leland at Goldwater Protest

    #defendicwa

    A photo posted by defendicwa (@defendicwa) on