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Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Adoptee Rights Coalition: #OBC ACCESS #ADOPTION

SOURCE: Adoptee Rights Coalition: 

Thank you for visiting this site to learn more about the issue of sealed original birth certificates (OBC) in the United States.

Please view or download our Comprehensive Lobby Packet for Adoptee Rights Legislation here.


Every person who is born in the United States receives a birth
certificate that recorded the historical event of their birth.  Birth
certificates have become increasingly used in to verify identity in our country.  When a child is adopted, which could be months or years after their birth, their original birth certificate is sealed and an amended one is issued that lists the adoptive parents as though they are the biological parents.
Although all 50 States have some law on the books allowing adult adoptees to access the original birth certificate, adult adoptees in all but six States encounter systemic barriers in accessing this record.
 This discrimination occurs for no other reason than the fact that the individual was legally adopted as a child.  The Adoptee Rights Coalition opposes policies that treat adopted persons differently than all other citizens born within a given State.  We believe that this institutionalized discrimination sends a negative message about being adopted.
We urge legislators to speak with their peers in Kansas and Alaska,
two states that have never sealed birth certificates of adopted persons. We also ask legislators to speak with their peers in Oregon, Alabama, New Hampshire and Maine, the four states that have passed legislation that gives adopted adults unconditional access to their birth certificates without any
restrictions upon reaching the age of 18. 
Adoptee Rights legislation has no fiscal impact.  It simply  acknowledges that adopted persons access their original birth certificate the same way those who are not adopted do.


The Adoptee Rights Coalition officially endorses Maine LD 1084 as model legislation for all other States in the U.S.  LD 1084 gave
adopted persons born in Maine equal access to their original birth certificates while allowing original parents to state their boundaries in a non-legally binding Contact Preference Form.
*******************
OHIO Update
On December 19, 2013, Ohio Governor John Kasich signed Substitute Senate Bill 23 into law, granting 400,000 adoptees born January 1, 1964 through September 18, 1996 access to their original birth certificates. The law has two key dates.
Between today, March 20, 2014, and March 19, 2015, birth parents may file a “Contact Preference” form or a “Birth Parent Name Redaction” form.  The redaction form allows a birth parent to have his or her name removed from the original birth certificate prior to its requested release. If a birth parent chooses to submit the form, a complete social/medical history form must also be submitted. All forms are voluntary, and if the handful of states that have enacted similar legislation are an indicator, a very small percentage of birth parents choose to redact.


Once this waiting period is complete, adoptees can apply for their original birth certificates beginning March 20, 2015.


*******************

Restored OBC Access States

The following states have restored the right for an adoptee to legally obtain his or her original birth certificate (OBC).


Alaska:

OBC’s Never Sealed


Kansas:

OBC’s Never Sealed


Alabama:

OBC’s Sealed 1991

Access Restored 2000


Delaware:

Access Restored 1999


Illinois:  

OBC’s Sealed 1946

Access Restored 2010


Maine:  

OBC’s Sealed 1953

Access Restored 2009


New Hampshire:  

OBC’s Sealed 1973

Access Restored 2005


Oregon:  

OBC’s Sealed 1957

Access Restored 2000


Ohio:  

OBC’s Sealed 1964

Access In Process 2014


Rhode Island:  

OBC’s Sealed 1944

Access Restored 2012


Tennessee:

OBC’s Sealed 1951

Access Restored 1999




We'll be posting more about which states are opening OBC access soon...Trace

1 comment:

  1. Washington State gave access to OBC's on June 1, 2014. At that time the turn-around once you sent in your application was 6 weeks. It may be shorter now due to reduced volume.

    ReplyDelete

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